DAILY BRIEF

Mar 27, 2017

NEWS YOU SHOULDN’T MISS

  • 1

    Huayi Brothers Seeks to Expand Ties With STX Entertainment

    Chinese film producer Huayi Brothers is seeking to renew and expand its ties to Robert Simonds’ STX Entertainment, despite recent capital controls imposed by Beijing that have set back several China-Hollywood deals. Bloomberg

  • 2

    Investing with Chinese Celebrities

    Forget corporate earnings and management strategies. Chinese investors have another game plan: Just watch where movie stars are putting their money and follow their lead. Nikkei Asian Review

  • 3

    Hong Kong Movie Icon Tsui Hark on Stephen Chow's Ego, His Lifetime Achievement Award and 'Detective Dee 3'

    There are a few things Tsui Hark can’t be sure about – how many films he’s made, for example – but he’s always backed himself to succeed no matter what others tell him, he says, and his record stands for all to see. South China Morning Post

  • 4

    A Brief Guide to the Hong Kong Film Classification System

    Following the recent controversy surrounding a “gay moment” in Disney’s latest offering of "Beauty and the Beast," we look into how Hong Kong classifies its films and decides what you can and cannot watch on a trip to the cinema. South China Morning Post

  • 5

    Chinese Actress Jelly Lin Yun received Rising Star of Asia Award at the 11th Asian Film Awards

    Recently the Asian Film Awards announced that this year’s Rising Star of Asia Award recipient will be Jelly Lin Yun. The actress is most memorable for her performance in Stephen Chow’s "The Mermaid," a film that turned out to be a phenomenon at the Chinese box office. Eastern Kicks

HEADLINES FROM CHINA

  • 1

    How Audience Tastes Have Changed since 2010

    Action films emerge as an obvious winner in Ent Group's tracking of the market share and box office performance of different film genres from 2010 to 2016. The popularity of romances has abated since 2013, and while fantasy films only make up a small portion of the movies released every year because of the production budgets they require, they reap substantial box office proceeds compared to other genres. Ent Group

  • 2

    Industry Insiders Give Their Take on the Recent Crackdown of Box Office Fraud

    On March 21, 326 cinemas were fined or had their operations suspended because they were found guilty of box office fraud. The move from China's SAPPRFT against box office fraud as been seen as part of the government's concerted effort to enforce China's new film law and eliminate box office fraud. Industry executives have so far been supportive of the government's tougher stance against offenders and believe that the latest crackdown should pave the way for more comprehensive legislation against fraud and other offences. China Film Organization

  • 3

    'The Summer Is Gone' Receive a Rare Arthouse Film Premiere

    Thanks to the founding of an arthouse theater alliance last year, the award-winning film "The Summer Is Gone" had over 7,000 screenings in theaters for its premiere, a rarity for arthouse films in China. But while the Dalei Zhang-directed drama has had more exposure thanks to the arthouse theater alliance, many issues, especially those related to administrational policy, still beset the system of distribution and exhibition of art films. Sansheng

  • 4

    April Will Likely Be Dominated by Hollywood Blockbusters

    Box office analysts at Mtime are predicting that Hollywood imports like "The Fate of the Furious" and "Ghost in the Shell" will likely dominate China's box office in April when they premiere. Domestic films stand a slim chance against these foreign imports and currently have their premiere dates targeting the Tomb-Sweeping Festival holiday and the International Worker's Day in the hopes to bolster their ticket sales. Mtime

  • 5

    Why Movie Stars in China Are Going into TV

    Even director-actor Jiang Wen, who once described TV shows as being appealing as "bath water," has returned to the small screen for a historical drama called "Caocao" after a 23-year long hiatus. As the success of movies become less predicated upon the fame of older, veteran stars and the salaries for the talent on TV shows continue to rise, more and more movie stars are now moving into the territory of TV dramas. Yiqipaidianying